Tales from the border

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  • US Mexico Tales From the Border
    AP22037597_000001
    US Mexico Tales From the Border
    03/31/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    In this Friday, March 31, 2017 photo, a fifth grade student shows his geometry work to a teacher at Columbus Elementary School, in Columbus, New Mexico. American kids living in Mexico make up about 60 percent of Columbus Elementary's student body. Many are the children of parents who were deported and moved here to be able to send their kids to school in the United States. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/XABD122/17097581508760/MARCH 31, 2017 PHOTO/1704071902

  • US Mexico Tales From the Border
    AP22037597_000004
    US Mexico Tales From the Border
    04/02/2017
    Rodrigo ABD/AP/SIPA
    In this Sunday, April 2, 2017 photo, Rachel Baker, a Unitarian minister from Las Vegas, Nev., puts her arms through the slats of the U.S.-Mexico border fence, to make a selfie as she takes part in a solidarity march in Nogales, Ariz.. Baker argues we should be tearing down the existing barrier instead of talking about building a bigger one. "I think it's a terrible idea," she says. "I'm not interested in separating families." (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/XABD120/17097581400976/APRIL 2, 2017...

  • US Mexico Tales From the Border
    AP22037597_000007
    US Mexico Tales From the Border
    04/02/2017
    Brian Skoloff/AP/SIPA
    This Sunday, April 2, 2017 photo made with a drone shows the U.S. Mexico border fence cuts through the two downtowns of Nogales. The fence meant to divide serves as a meeting place for family and friends.(AP Photo/Brian Skoloff)/XABD123/ec07ca945a684c1c842e1995dd9ebd2c-34ecdb281cb440459b/APRIL 2, 2017 PHOTO/1704071946

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22036641_000002
    Tales from the Border
    04/03/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Rancher Jim Chilton's rifle is propped against a wall inside his ranch in Arivaca, Ariz., Sunday, April 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD103/17094698669940/1704051919

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22036641_000001
    Tales from the Border
    04/03/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Rancher Jim Chilton talks to his wife Sue before heading to survey their 50,000 acre ranch in Arivaca, Ariz., Sunday, April 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD104/17094698644584/1704051919

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22036641_000007
    Tales from the Border
    04/03/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Rancher Jim Chilton poses for a photo next to a taxidermied mountain lion at his ranch in Arivaca, Ariz., Sunday, April 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD104/17094698647783/1704051924

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22036641_000004
    Tales from the Border
    04/03/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Rancher Jim Chilton drives his pick-up truck on his property which includes a 5 ½-mile stretch of border that's marked only by a four-strand barbed wire fence, in Arivaca, Ariz., Sunday, April 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD102/17094698739059/1704051921

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22036641_000003
    Tales from the Border
    04/03/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Rancher Jim Chilton puts on his hat before heading out to survey his 50,000-acre ranch in Arivaca, about 80 miles southwest of Tucson, Ariz., Sunday, April 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD101/17094698453453/1704051920

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22036641_000006
    Tales from the Border
    04/03/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Rancher Jim Chilton shows off a combover hairstyle after removing his hat in his 50,000-acre ranch along the US-Mexico border in Arivaca, Ariz., Sunday, April 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD105/17094698602654/1704051923

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22036641_000005
    Tales from the Border
    04/03/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A photo of rancher Jim Chilton showing how easy it is to climb under the existing barbed wire fence on his ranch along the US-Mexico border, is displayed in his home in Arivaca, Ariz., Sunday, April 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD108/17094698494609/1704051923

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22036641_000008
    Tales from the Border
    04/03/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Rancher Jim Chilton prepares dinner with his wife Sue, inside the home of their 50,000 acre ranch in Arivaca, Arizona, Sunday, April 2, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD111/17094698927817/1704051930

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22037232_000001
    Tales from the Border
    04/04/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Mark Hainds, a 48-year-old junior community college forestry professor from Andalusia, Alabama, walks on the shoulder of a road near Why, Ariz., Monday, April 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD102/17096728189700/1704062223

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22037232_000002
    Tales from the Border
    04/04/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Mark Hainds of Andalusia, Alabama, stands next to a road memorial for a Border Patrol agent killed in a car accident, near Why, Ariz., Monday, April 3, 2017. Hainds is attempting to walk the length of the U.S.-Mexico border. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD101/17096728280519/1704062223

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22037232_000007
    Tales from the Border
    04/04/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A pair of what is known as "carpet shoes", used by drug smugglers to hide their tracks, lies abandoned on the side of a remote highway near Why, Arizona, Monday, April 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD108/17096728266299/1704062229

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22037232_000004
    Tales from the Border
    04/04/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Mark Hainds, who is traveling the length of the U.S.-Mexico border by foot, arrives at the Coyote Howls RV park near Why, Arizona, Monday, April 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD103/17096728185672/1704062228

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22037232_000006
    Tales from the Border
    04/04/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Mark Hainds, a 48-year-old junior community college forestry professor from Andalusia, Alabama, walks about 3 miles from his stopping point, near Why, Ariz., Monday, April 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD103/17096728233065/1704062229

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22037232_000003
    Tales from the Border
    04/04/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Mark Hainds points to a map he drew that shows where he will sleep for the night, during his border trek, near Why, Arizona, Monday, April 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD105/17096728185599/1704062228

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22037232_000005
    Tales from the Border
    04/04/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Mark Hainds of Andalusia, Alabama, left, enjoys a beer at the end of a day's walk in the home of archeologist Rick Martynec in Why, Arizona, Monday, April 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD106/17096728208598/1704062229

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22037232_000008
    Tales from the Border
    04/04/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Mark Hainds, a 48-year-old junior community college forestry professor from Andalusia, Alabama, walks on the shoulder of a road near Why, Ariz., Monday, April 3, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD107/17096759780177/1704062318

  • Mexico US Tales From the Border
    AP22037598_000001
    Mexico US Tales From the Border
    04/05/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    In this Tuesday, April 4, 2017 photo, man who gave his name as Hugo stands on the shore of the Pacific Ocean as his friend films him, backdropped by the US-Mexico border fence that separates Tijuana, Mexico, from San Diego, Calif. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/XABD125/17097581730620/APRIL 4, 2017 PHOTO/1704071902

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22035288_000001
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A Border Patrol vehicle is illuminated by a flood light during a night patrol near a new stretch of the border fence at the US-Mexico border in Sunland Park, New Mexico, Thursday, March 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD111/17092071711048/1704020413

  • US Mexico Border Daily
    AP22035287_000001
    US Mexico Border Daily
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Children jump on a trampoline not far from the US-Mexico border in Sunland Park, New Mexico, Thursday, March 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD108/17092071402054/1704020413

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034936_000005
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/31/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A portion of the new steel border fence stretches along the US-Mexico border in Sunland Park, New Mexico, Thursday, March 30, 2017. This fencing just west of the New Mexico state line was planned and started before President Donald Trump's election, adding to the 650 miles of fences, walls and vehicle barriers that already exist along the nearly 2,000-mile frontier. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD108/17091018913004/1704010246

  • Tales From the Border
    AP22035282_000002
    Tales From the Border
    03/31/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A woman walks with a dog during a dust storm in Palomas, Mexico, Friday, March 31, 2017. Winds gusts to 50 mph and brown out the sky with dust. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD103/17092049169103/1704020404

  • Tales From the Border
    AP22035282_000001
    Tales From the Border
    03/31/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A fifth grade student shows his geometry work to a teacher at Columbus Elementary School, in Columbus, New Mexico, Friday, March 31, 2017. American kids living in Mexico make up about 60 percent of Columbus Elementary’s student body. Many are the children of parents who were deported and moved here to be able to send their kids to school in the United States. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD103/17092049125851/1704020404

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22035282_000005
    Tales from the Border
    03/31/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Students from Columbus Elementary School, walk next to a Mexican soldier while crossing the border from Columbus, New Mexico, US, into Palomas, Mexico, after school, Friday, March 31, 2017. American kids living in Mexico make up about 60 percent of Columbus Elementary’s student body. Many are the children of parents who were deported and moved here to be able to send their kids to school in the United States. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD120/17092049260856/1704020410

  • Tales From the Border
    AP22035282_000004
    Tales From the Border
    03/31/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Columbus Elementary School students walk towards the U.S. port of entry on the border with Puerto Palomas, Mexico, after attending school in Columbus, New Mexico, Friday, March 31, 2017. American kids living in Mexico make up about 60 percent of Columbus Elementary’s student body. Many are the children of parents who were deported and moved here to be able to send their kids to school in the United States. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD108/17092049239499/1704020410

  • Tales From the Border
    AP22035282_000003
    Tales From the Border
    03/31/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Students wait inside a school bus at Columbus Elementary School, in Columbus, New Mexico, Friday, March 31, 2017, to be transported to the U.S. port of entry on the border with Puerto Palomas, Mexico. American kids living in Mexico make up about 60 percent of Columbus Elementary’s student body. Many are the children of parents who were deported and moved here to be able to send their kids to school in the United States. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD107/17092049217543/1704020410

  • US Mexico Border Daily Life
    AP22035285_000002
    US Mexico Border Daily Life
    03/31/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A mural depicts Mexican bandit and guerrilla leader in the Mexican Revolution Pancho Villa, right, and U.S Gen. John J. Pershing, side by side, on the wall of a cafe in Columbus, New Mexico, Friday, March 31, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD102/17092049265016/1704020416

  • Tales from the Border
    AP22035282_000006
    Tales from the Border
    03/31/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Fourth graders point out where they live on a map during a geography lesson class at the Columbus Elementary School, in Columbus, New Mexico, Friday, March 31, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD101/17092049282421/1704020419

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22035288_000002
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/31/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Dairy cattle feed at a farm near Vado, New Mexico, Friday, March 31, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD101/17092049297025/1704020419

  • Tales From the Border
    AP22035282_000007
    Tales From the Border
    03/31/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A woman walks with a dog during a dust storm in Palomas, Mexico, Friday, March 31, 2017. Winds gusts to 50 mph and brown out the sky with dust. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD103/d1ca279584dc4fcfb62bddc99944b605-871e425545814357a7/1704020441

  • APTOPIX Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22033999_000001
    APTOPIX Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/28/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Margaret McCall, a clean energy consultant from Chicago, sits in Santa Elena Canyon in the Rio Grande river facing a cliff that is Mexico, as she vacations at Big Bend National Park in Texas, Monday, March 27, 2017. When asked about the border wall, McCall said: "My first thought is: has Donald Trump seen this cliff? Because unless you're building a 500-foot wall it's really not going to cut it." (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD107/17088726890210/1703300207

  • The Week That Was in Latin America Photo Gallery
    AP22034545_000019
    The Week That Was in Latin America Photo Gallery
    03/28/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    In this March 27, 2017 photo, tourists pose for photos in Santa Elena Canyon near a cliff face that is Mexico, on the banks of the Rio Grande river in Big Bend National Park in Texas. Here the Rio Grande slides between two sheer cliff faces, one in Mexico and one in the United States, that tower 1,500 feet above the water. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/XEV305/17090076132946/1703310547

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000018
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/29/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A fence marks the border between Mexico and the U.S. in the Juarez Valley, Mexico, Wednesday, March 29, 2017, across the border from the outskirts of El Paso, Texas. This border fence was planned and started before President Donald Trump's election. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD303/dc1815268ae1441cb598e495e98190bb-1049231a4af648429e/1703310112

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000013
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/29/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A farm located adjacent to the fence at the US-Mexico border in the Juarez valley, Mexico, Wednesday, March 29, 2017, across from the outskirts of El Paso, Texas. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD103/17089821169826/1703310104

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000015
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/29/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Rohan Ayala stands next to his father outside their home, meters from the fence marking the U.S.-Mexico border in Juarez Valley, Mexico, Wednesday, March 29, 201, across the border from the outskirts of El Paso, Texas. A segment of new fencing is being erected by the U.S. government outside El Paso, Texas, just west of the New Mexico state line. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD304/299d8e8897604624ace3d10a0ae11e53-44e0a0c1f8d94b2390/1703310111

  • APTOPIX Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034464_000002
    APTOPIX Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/29/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Clothes lay abandoned near a newly erected fence at the U.S.-Mexico border in the Anapra neighborhood of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Wednesday, March 29, 2017, across from Sunland Park, New Mexico. Residents of Anapra, a neighborhood anchored to the dunes, have fought to get running water, electricity and some paved streets in recent years. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD305/17089806872287/1703310101

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000005
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A worker welds a new fence between the Anapra neighborhood of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, and Sunland Park, New Mexico, Thursday, March 30, 2017. The top three feet or so of the fence, which was planned and started before President Donald Trump's election, are a solid panel of oxidized steel. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD306/17089806826487/1703310037

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000007
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A boy walks away from the municipal garbage dump where he threw away the casing of an unusable TV, in the Anapra neighborhood of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Thursday, March 30, 2017, across the border from Sunland Park, New Mexico. The trash can reads in Spanish "Christ loves you." (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD308/17089806813492/1703310040

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000008
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Workers use a crane to lift a segment of a new fence into place on the U.S. side of the border with Mexico, where Sunland Park, New Mexico, meets the Anapra neighborhood of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Thursday, March 30, 2017. Residents on the Mexico side estimate 15 to 20 panels go up daily. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD309/17089806933727/1703310040

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000009
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A man burns trash near the border fence in the Anapra neighborhood of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, late Wednesday, March 29, 2017, across the border from Sunland Park, New Mexico. Residents of Anapra, a neighborhood anchored to the dunes, have fought to get running water, electricity and some paved streets in recent years. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD310/17089806883478/1703310043

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000012
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Children play on two fences marking the U.S.-Mexico border, in the Anapra neighborhood of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Wednesday, March 29, 2017, across the border form Sunland Park, New Mexico. In Mexico, people have lived and worked in the existing fence's shadow for years. That experience has made them dispassionate toward talk of new construction of a larger wall. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD312/17089806931975/1703310050

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000010
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Claudia Sanchez holds a broom outside her shack home in the Anapra neighborhood of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Wednesday, March 29, 2017, across the border from Sunland Park, New Mexico. Homes in this area are made of concrete block, wooden pallets, and any sort of recovered material that can withstand the wind and hold back the blowing sand of the dunes. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD307/17089806715996/1703310049

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000011
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Children play a coin toss game in the sand as a train passes behind the fence marking the U.S.-Mexico border, in the Anapra neighborhood of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Wednesday, March 29, 2017, across the border from Sunland Park, New Mexico. There are more than 650 miles of fence, wall and vehicle barriers along the nearly 2,000-mile border. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD311/17089806870158/1703310050

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000014
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Workers use a crane to lift a segment of a new fence into place on the U.S. side of the border with Mexico, where Sunland Park, New Mexico, meets the Anapra neighborhood of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Thursday, March 30, 2017. Residents on the Mexico side estimate 15 to 20 panels go up daily. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD102/17089821466565/1703310104

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000016
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A worker welds a new fence between the Anapra neighborhood of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, and Sunland Park, New Mexico, Thursday, March 30, 2017. The top three feet or so of the fence, which was planned and started before President Donald Trump's election, are a solid panel of oxidized steel. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD306/5ed98dba81f34e52ba3b96cd6005e4f7-ec22d4f24b26435590/1703310111

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034454_000017
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A woman stands outside her home located next to the border fence between the U.S. and Mexico, the gray, metal gate behind her, in the Anapra neighborhood of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Wednesday, March 29, 2017, across the border from Sunland Park, New Mexico. This week, Mexican residents like her are losing their view toward the U.S. as each hour a crew welds into place two more segments of steel border fence. (AP Photo/Rodrigo...

  • APTOPIX Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22034471_000001
    APTOPIX Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/30/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A youth looks at a new, taller fence being built along U.S.-Mexico border, replacing the shorter, gray metal fence in front of it, in the Anapra neighborhood of Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Wednesday, March 29, 2017, across the border from Sunland Park, New Mexico. Construction of a new wall is likely to happen in a place like the desert west of here where the government already controls the land and there isn't already an effective obstacle. (AP Photo/Rodrigo...

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22033127_000006
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/27/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Boots decorate a wall at the Bad Rabbit Cafe in Terlingua, Texas, near the US-Mexico border, Monday, March 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD112/17087543641629/1703281726

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22033127_000011
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/27/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Mail boxes stand in a line in Terlingua, Texas, near the US-Mexico border, Monday, March 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD112/17087660185293/1703282031

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22033127_000007
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/27/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A car with a message written on its dusty back window sits abandon on the side of a road in Terlingua, Texas, near the US-Mexico border, Monday, March 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD111/756a0e9f642f49bf8e66a15ec44c4252-139418239fda416c92/1703281802

  • APTOPIX Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22033145_000001
    APTOPIX Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/27/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A dinosaur statue stands outside a store off the highway in Terlingua, Texas, near the US-Mexico border, Monday, March 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD102/17087539340425/1703281758

  • APTOPIX Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22033145_000002
    APTOPIX Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/27/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Stars fill the sky over Tin Valley Retro Rentals where tourists can sleep in tipi-style tents in Terlingua, Texas, near the US-Mexico border, late Monday, March 27, 2017. The rental options are on about 90 acres of desert, where Airstream trailers and old buses are converted into quarters. People can also sleep in one of two tipis. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD102/17087539273504/1703281801

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22033127_000010
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/27/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Stars fill the sky over Tin Valley Retro Rentals where tourists can sleep in Terlingua, Texas, near the US-Mexico border, late Monday, March 27, 2017. The rental options are on about 90 acres of desert, where Airstream trailers and old buses are converted into quarters. People can also sleep in one of two tipis. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD102/17087554179078/1703281856

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22033127_000009
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/26/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    The Pecos River near the US-Mexico border in Texas, Monday, March 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD109/17087554115352/1703281852

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22033127_000003
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/26/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    The Pecos River near the US-Mexico border in Texas, Monday, March 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD109/17087539211948/1703281725

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032208_000003
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Migrants look at a map of Mexico after breakfast at the "Casa del Migrante" shelter in Nuevo Laredo ,Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Saturday March, 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD108/17084736823879/1703252134

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032804_000001
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/26/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A Cuban man shaves inside migrant shelter "Casa del Migrante" in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Saturday, March 25, 2017, across the border from Laredo, Texas. Some Cubans have been stuck here since then-President Barack Obama on Jan. 12 ended the so-called " wet foot, dry foot” policy that had given Cubans a privileged path to the U.S. Until then, nearly any Cubans reaching U.S. soil had the right to stay, but now they are treated like migrants from other nations, facing a much...

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032804_000004
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/26/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Migrants have a dinner of rice and beans at the migrant shelter "Casa del Migrante" in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Saturday, March 25, 2017, across the border from Laredo, Texas. Some Cubans have been stuck here since then-President Barack Obama on Jan. 12 ended the so-called " wet foot, dry foot” policy that had given Cubans a privileged path to the U.S. Until then, nearly any Cubans reaching U.S. soil had the right to stay, but now they are treated like migrants from other...

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032804_000007
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/26/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Cubans sit in migrant shelter "Casa del Migrante" in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Saturday, March 25, 2017, across the border from Laredo, Texas. Some Cubans have been stuck here since then-President Barack Obama on Jan. 12 ended the so-called " wet foot, dry foot” policy that had given Cubans a privileged path to the U.S. Until then, nearly any Cubans reaching U.S. soil had the right to stay, but now they are treated like migrants from other nations, facing a much tougher...

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032208_000002
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A man wearing a T-shirt depicting the statue of liberty with a skull face laughs as he walks during a march against violence organized by local churches in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Saturday March, 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD103/17084736756983/1703252134

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032208_000005
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A man gestures while passing next to a statue former Mexico's President Benito Juarez during a march against violence organized by local churches in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Saturday March, 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD102/17084736722946/1703252137

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032208_000004
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Pregnant women ride on a float during a march against violence organized by local churches in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state Mexico, Saturday March, 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD101/17084736824185/1703252135

  • APTOPIX Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032434_000001
    APTOPIX Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    People cool off in the Rio Grand river, or Rio Grande and Rio Bravo in Spanish, in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Saturday, March 25, 2017, across the border from Laredo, Texas. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD101/17085616770324/1703261943

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032331_000010
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A man fishes by a cross in memory of a migrant who died trying to cross to the U.S., on the bank of the Rio Grande river in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Saturday, March 25, 2017, across the border from Laredo, Texas. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD102/17085616725984/1703261940

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032804_000005
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Cuban Rudy Rivero leads a religious procession, adapted to reflect the plight of immigrants, in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Friday, March 24, 2017, across the border from Laredo, Texas. Some Cubans have been stuck here since then-President Barack Obama on Jan. 12 ended the so-called " wet foot, dry foot” policy that had given Cubans a privileged path to the U.S. Until then, nearly any Cubans reaching U.S. soil had the right to stay, but now they are treated like migrants from...

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032804_000003
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Cuban Idenia Vidal leads a religious procession adapted to reflect the plight of immigrants, in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Friday, March, 24, 2017, across the border from Laredo, Texas. Some Cubans have been stuck here since then-President Barack Obama on Jan. 12 ended the so-called " wet foot, dry foot” policy that had given Cubans a privileged path to the U.S. Until then, nearly any Cubans reaching U.S. soil had the right to stay, but now they are treated like migrants from...

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032804_000006
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Cuban migrant Maite Silva performs the role of the Virgin Mary during a religious procession adapted to reflect the plight of immigrants, in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Friday, March 24, 2017, across the border from Laredo, Texas. Some Cubans have been stuck here since then-President Barack Obama on Jan. 12 ended the so-called " wet foot, dry foot” policy that had given Cubans a privileged path to the U.S. Until then, nearly any Cubans reaching U.S. soil had the right to stay,...

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032804_000002
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Cuban Elaide Vilchez carries her one-month-old daughter Emily Melania Garcia during a religious procession adapted to reflect the plight of immigrants, in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Friday, March 24, 2017, across the border from Laredo, Texas. Some Cubans have been stuck here since then-President Barack Obama on Jan. 12 ended the so-called " wet foot, dry foot” policy that had given Cubans a privileged path to the U.S. Until then, nearly any Cubans reaching U.S. soil had the...

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032331_000004
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A mariachi band waits for clients in downtown Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, across the border from Laredo in the U.S, Friday March 24, 2017.(AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/XABD105/17085169072702/1703260651

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032331_000002
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A mariachi waits for clients in downtown Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, across the border from Laredo in the U.S, Friday March 24, 2017.(AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/XABD104/17085168896228/1703260651

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032331_000003
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/25/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A boy peeks out of the window of his house in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, across the border from Laredo in the U.S, Friday March 24, 2017.(AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/XABD102/17085169006306/1703260651

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032331_000001
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/24/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A man sells newspapers in downtown Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, across the border from Laredo in the U.S, Friday March 24, 2017. Th headlines read in Spanish 'visa requirements get harder' top, and 'policemen are sued', bottom.(AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/XABD101/17085168772913/1703260651

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031836_000010
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/24/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A truck advertising an auto body repair shop is suspended in the air along the road in Los Guerra, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Thursday, March 23, 2017, across the border from Fronton, Texas. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD112/17083742108299/1703242210

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031836_000008
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/23/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A truck advertising an auto body repair shop is suspended in the air, behind the cemetery in Los Guerra, Tamaulipas, Mexico, Thursday, March 23, 2017, across the border from Fronton, Texas. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD106/17083742097464/1703242205

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031323_000001
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/23/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    People stand in a bus waiting to go home after their work day at a "maquiladora" in Matamoros, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Wednesday, March, 22, 2017, across the border from Brownsville, Texas. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD102/17082577940063/1703231858

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031323_000006
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/22/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Mexican marines patrol downtown Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, across the border from Brownsville, Texas. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD105/9133ddf1b68a4f4d8520d269e10eaccf-c0d9f259f0c54f4aac/1703232044

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031836_000007
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/22/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Migrants Juan Parras, 65, right, and Junior Matute, 19, rest on their beds at the migrant shelter "Senda de Vida" in Reynosa, Mexico, Wednesday, March, 22, 2017. Matute said his brother was deported from the United States to Honduras and then murdered in February 2016. " I come for a reason. It’s not like one day I just decided to leave my country,” he says. Parras said he was deported one year ago from California, where he left behind three sons, and that he plans to try to return. (AP...

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031836_000006
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/22/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Migrant shelter "Senda de Vida" stands in Reynosa, Mexico, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. From 2014 through parts of last year, this shelter was humming with Central American families and also some unaccompanied minor, but today there are just a few migrants here. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD111/17083623709246/1703242013

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031836_000004
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/22/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A deported migrant prays before eating lunch in "La Casa del Migrante" migrant shelter in Reynosa, Mexico, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD102/17083621761205/1703242007

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031836_000005
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/22/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A phone used by migrants to call their families sits in the "Casa del Migrante" migrant shelter in Matamoros, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, across the border from Brownsville, Texas. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD108/17083621909294/1703242007

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031836_000003
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/23/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Leonel Gomez fishes with his daughter on the bank of the Rio Grande river in Miguel Aleman, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, across the border from Roma, Texas. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD111/17083623453488/1703242007

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031323_000004
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/22/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A family have a picnic on the bank of the Rio Grande river in Miguel Aleman, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, located across from Roma, Texas. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD103/17082576269399/1703232007

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031323_000005
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/22/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    A guard dog paces the roof of a bakery in Matamoros, Tamaulipas state, Mexico, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, across the border from Brownsville, Texas. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD106/17082577960771/1703232007

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032331_000006
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/22/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    The home of Jesus Esteban Cruz in Reynosa, Mexico, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, across the border from McAllen, Texas. Cruz's 20-yar-old daughter Paula says she’s going to write a book someday about her single mother who moved to Reynosa and raised three kids who stayed out of trouble despite the turmoil that swirled around them. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD106/17085573341976/1703261852

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032331_000007
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/22/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Jesus Esteban Cruz stands inside her bedroom in Reynosa, Mexico, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, across the border from McAllen, Texas. Esteban says the local drug gang has not threatened or extorted her, and if anything these days is keeping the neighborhood in order. Meanwhile she alters uniforms for soldiers at a nearby base on her little sewing machine. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD00/17085576786280/1703261852

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22032331_000008
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/22/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    The ceiling of Jesus Esteban Cruz's dinning room in Reynosa, Mexico, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, across the border from McAllen, Texas. Esteban Cruz says the local drug gang has not threatened or extorted her, and if anything these days is keeping the neighborhood in order. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD113/17085573331043/1703261855

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031836_000001
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/22/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Mexican migrant Juan Parras, 65, poses for a portrait in the dormitory at the migrant shelter "Senda de Vida" in Reynosa, Mexico, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. Parras said he was deported one year ago from California, where he left behind three sons, and that he plans to try to return but it's more difficult now to get past U.S. security. Regarding the proposed border wall, Parras said "Mexico is not going to pay for the wall." (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD101/17083621708975/1703242004

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22031323_000002
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/22/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Delfino Luis Trevino, with his head bandaged, rests on a bunk bed at the "Senda de Vida" migrant shelter in Reynosa, Mexico, Wednesday, March 22, 2017. Trevino, from Veracruz, Mexico, said he was beaten one week ago by "polleros," the Spanish name for human traffickers on the border, because he tried to cross to McAllen, Texas without hiring them. He said they where charging $500 dollars. (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd)/ABD101/17082576571244/1703231953

  • Mexico US Border Daily Life
    AP22033127_000002
    Mexico US Border Daily Life
    03/27/2017
    Rodrigo Abd/AP/SIPA
    Associated Press team, writer Christopher Sherman, right, and photographer Rodrigo Abd, stand next to their tipi-style tent lodging at Tin Valley Retro Rentals in Terlingua, Texas, near the US-Mexico border, Monday, March 27, 2017. The AP has sent the team on a nearly two-week journey, from west to east along the entire length of the US-Mexico, to bring us fresh voices and images from both sides of these vast and varied borderlands and see what is happening on the ground. (AP Photo/Rodrigo...