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  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000001
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    08/08/2015
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000002
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    22/08/2019
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000003
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    22/08/2019
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000004
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    08/08/2015
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000005
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    08/08/2015
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000006
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    08/08/2015
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000007
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    08/08/2015
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000008
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    08/08/2015
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000009
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    11/08/2015
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000010
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    11/06/2016
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000011
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    02/06/2017
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000012
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    02/06/2017
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000013
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    04/06/2016
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...

  • BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    00920418_000014
    BEES LIVE IN CELLO
    04/06/2016
    CATERS/SIPA
    Pic by Caters News - Pictured: There are 40,000 bees living inside this cello and from the sounds of it, they seem perfectly happy. Martin Bencsik, 50, an associate physics professor from Nottingham Trent University, was first inspired to put the bees inside the cello in 2015 as part of a World XPO project he was working on. He got the idea from his wife Deidre, a cellist, who recovered a broken cello five years ago. Martins main research involves vibrations the bees use, so he was interested...